Marcus Cannon

Steal of the Draft: Marcus Cannon

With the 138th pick in the draft the New England Patriots selected Marcus Cannon, a guard/tackle ‘tweener out of TCU.

A week ago the thought of Cannon slipping to the 5th rounded sounded absurd. He was the 31st-rated player on my board and a consensus 2nd round pick.

Cannon won't play in 2011, but could be a steal once he returns to full strength

However, in the week leading up to the draft it was revealed that Cannon had been diagnosed with lymphoma, a form of cancer in the lymph nodes. Cannon will undergo chemotherapy in the upcoming weeks and likely will not play in the NFL in 2011.

While the outlook for Cannon’s immediate future in the league is bleak, there is no reason he cannot beat cancer and return in 2012.

The struggle for Cannon will be gaining back the weight he’ll lose and turning himself back into the behemoth lineman he is today. It won’t be easy, but it’s possible. And in the 5th round he is well worth the risk.

I wish Cannon nothing but the best, and hope to see him back on the football field soon.

Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in 2011 NFL Draft, Patriots Comments Off

Marcus Cannon Scouting Report

Marcus Cannon OG TCU

Ht: 6’5

Wt: 358

Strengths:
Elite size and strength. Experience at left and right tackle. Powerful lower body strength; perfect fit for a team looking for a dominant run blocker. Above average quickness and athleticism for an interior lineman.
Weaknesses:
Too slow to play tackle in the pros; doesn’t have the footwork or the overall athleticism. Missed time with an ankle injury in 2008. Limited experience against top competition. No experience at guard, where he will likely play in the NFL.
Comments:
Cannon started off as a right tackle and eventually shifted to the left side at TCU. He dominated the Mountain West but just isn’t athletic enough to play tackle at the next level. At TCU he was strong enough to manhandle the speed rushers, and big enough to handle the bull rushers. When facing a more complete NFL-caliber pass rusher in the Rose Bowl against Wisconsin’s J.J. Watt, he was embarrassed on multiple plays and struggled to keep pace with Watt’s array of moves. That said, he has the size and more than enough athleticism to make the transition to guard.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 Comments Off