Scouting Reports – 2012

Leonard Johnson scouting report

Leonard Johnson CB Iowa State #23
Ht: 5’10″
Wt: 196
 
Strengths:
Physical corner who doesn’t back down from any assignment. Likes to play up at the line and does a great job jamming receivers at the line of scrimmage. Good all-around athlete; played quarterback in high school. Looks good in zone coverage; very patient and disciplined. Does a nice job getting his hands on the ball when in position to make a play. Has the size and strength to contribute in run support.
Weaknesses:
Needs to do a better job turning and locating the ball; has the skills to stay with a receiver, but consistently gets beat on jump balls because he’s too focused on mirroring the receiver and doesn’t turn to play the ball. Lack of height also hurts him in jump-ball situations. Run support is often just for show; gives just enough effort to get into the picture, but doesn’t consistently put forth the effort to shed blocks and make an impact play. Aggressive play leads to some penalties at times.
Comments:
If Johnson were two inches taller he may be a 1st-round pick, but his lack of height is just enough to drop him into the 2nd or 3rd round range. The one major concern I have with Johnson is his tendency to mirror the receiver until the last second. That, coupled with his physical style, is going to draw a lot of penalties in the NFL. However, it’s all about technique and it’s a very fixable issue.
Videos:
2011 vs Oklahoma State 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

A.J. Jenkins scouting report

A.J. Jenkins WR Illinois #8
Ht: 6’0″Wt: 190  
Strengths:
Impressive straight-line speed; can stretch the field at the next level. Fairly reliable hands; does a nice job catching away from his body and bringing it in. Impressive leaping ability; much better going up in traffic than you’d expect considering his size and build. Shows excellent body control along the sidelines. Efficient route runner; quick in his breaks and looks very fluid overall. Has the athleticism to make some acrobatic catches.
Weaknesses:
Needs to do a better job tracking the ball in the air; doesn’t always put himself in the best position to make plays. Not very physical; can get knocked off his route by more physical corners. A bit of a one-year wonder; didn’t really emerge as a playmaker until senior year. has struggled with drops in the past, but was more consistent as a senior. Clashed with Ron Zook at times; Zook didn’t like Jenkins tendency to showboat on the field – definitely raises some concerns about a “diva” complex.
Comments:
Jenkins lacks the prototypical size of a No. 1 receiver, but he does all the little things well to make up for his physical deficiencies. The key to Jenkins’ development will be his consistency. He made major strides his senior year, but his lapses in focus in the past will cause teams to worry about him as a one-year wonder who was simply motivated by an NFL contract. He is definitely a boom-or-bust prospect, but has the foundation to be an instant-impact player in the right system.
Videos:
2011 vs Northwestern
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 1 Comment

Tommy Streeter scouting report

Tommy Streeter WR Miami FL #8
Ht: 6’5″

Wt: 219

 
Strengths:
Elite height. Built like a true No. 1 receiver. Adequate straight-line speed; will be able to stretch the field on occasion at the next level. Has the raw talent to develop into a No. 1 or 2 option.
Weaknesses:
Inconsistent hands; will drop some very easy passes. Traps the ball against his body far too often and generally displays shaky fundamentals when putting himself in position to make a catch. More fast than quick; isn’t very explosive or elusive in tight spaces; takes time to get up to full speed. Isn’t nearly as good in traffic as you’d expect considering his size; leaping ability is average and doesn’t do a consistent job timing his jumps to pluck ball at its highest point. Route running is slow and deliberate; lacks the quick, fluid hips to shake corners.
Comments:
Streeter has the size to catch your attention, and also the speed to stretch the field. However, his raw talent is all he has going for him right now. He lacks the hands to produce as a possession receiver and his timed speed is misleading. He can stretch the field, but his route running is sloppy and he lacks the quickness to shake man coverage. He is definitely worth a mid-to-late round pick due to his raw skills, and he may develop into a quality receiver, but he is also very likely to be over-drafted due to his potential.
Videos:
2011 vs Virginia 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

T.Y. Hilton scouting report

T.Y. Hilton WR Florida International #4
Ht: 5’10″

Wt: 183

 
Strengths:
Dangerous in the open field; extremely quick and elusive. Has the speed to consistently stretch the field. Efficient route runner; very quick in his breaks and can quickly shake defenders who lack the footwork to stay with him. Reliable hands. Gives a solid effort as a blocker. Explosive return specialist. Hard worker off the field; well respected by coaches and teammates.
Weaknesses:
Undersized; may struggle to shake press coverage at the next level. Level of competition is a minor concern; hasn’t seen corners with the same size/athleticism combination he’ll face at the next level.
Comments:
Hilton is a prototypical slot receiver who can make big plays with his quickness. He’ll struggle in certain matchups due to his lack of strength, but as a 3rd option he can be a dangerous weapon who can stretch the field and also draw some attention away from from the top receivers. He reminds me of former Rams receiver Az-Zahir Hakim, who excelled as the 3rd option alongside Torry Holt and Isaac Bruce.
Videos:
2011 vs Louisville
2011 vs Troy/Arkansas State 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 1 Comment

Kelechi Osemele scouting report

Kelechi Osemele OG Iowa State #72
Ht: 6’6″

Wt: 333

 
Strengths:
Elite size and strength. Physical blocker once he’s engaged. Has the potential to be a dominant interior run blocker. Four year starter, primarily playing left tackle. A team leader on the field. Gives a solid effort to get to the second level.
Weaknesses:
Lacks the athleticism to play left tackle in the pros. Quickness off the snap is a concern; kind of a slow, lumbering player who takes too long to get into his stance to excel at tackle. Lateral quickness is well below average for a tackle. Plays too high; needs to stay low if he’s going to hold his ground against physical bull rushers at the next level. Especially struggles to stay low as the play extends. Technique is extremely sloppy for a four-year starter. Panics when he starts to lose control of block and will get called for holding.
Comments:
Osemele’s size is very intriguing, but one should always be wary of a prospect with this much experience who still struggles with the fundamentals of the game. Moving to guard will minimize the issue with his quickness and athleticism, but his inability to stay low enough to hold his ground is a concern. Elite NFL interior pass rushers will feast on his tendency play high. He should not be viewed as an immediate starter, but does have the potential to develop into a physical run blocker down the road.
Videos:
2010 vs Oklahoma
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 1 Comment

Josh Chapman scouting report

Josh Chapman DT Alabama #99
Ht: 6’1″

Wt: 316

 
Strengths:
Prototypical nose tackle. A big, physical presence in the middle of the defensive line; a true space-eater. Fairly quick off the snap for a big man. Has a powerful bull rush which requires the attention of two offensive linemen. Does a nice job using leverage to hold his ground at the point of attack. Gives an honest effort in pursuit, despite his lack of speed; rarely gives up on a play. Tough guy who played through torn ACL for much of senior year.
Weaknesses:
Limited athletically; won’t make plays in pursuit and will rarely get to the quarterback. Short and stocky; doesn’t have the height or the arm length to disrupt passing lanes and rarely even puts in the effort. Fairly easily slowed down by double teams; lacks the elite size or strength to consistently plow through into the backfield. Suffered a torn ACL which required surgery in January, 2011. Missed entire 2007 season with shoulder injury (redshirted).
Comments:
Chapman is intriguing due to his size, and he can definitely play nose tackle at the next level, but he lacks the elite measurables to warrant a high pick. While he does have the strength to take on multiple blockers, he struggles to shed blocks and become disruptive in the backfield. He’s the type of player that does everything reasonable well, but nothing great and has a limited ceiling as a result. Assuming his knee checks out, he’s a very safe mid-round pick, but may only be a backup in the NFL.
Videos:
2010 season 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

Harrison Smith scouting report

Harrison Smith S Notre Dame #22
Ht: 6’2″Wt: 213  
Strengths:
Prototypical size and strength for a strong safety. Smart, patient player; does a nice job staying in his space and not biting on fakes or over-pursuing. Some experience blitzing off the edge; gets a nice jump and is quick enough to evade blockers in the backfield. Consistently takes the correct angles in pursuit and is a real asset in run support. Keeps his eyes in the backfield and is quick to adjust; adept at reading the quarterback’s eyes. Adequate straight-line speed.
Weaknesses:
Limited ball skills; 7 interceptions as junior were misleading, many a result of being in right place at right time. More fast than quick. Limited athleticism; doesn’t have the change-of-direction ability necessary to stick with more athletic tight ends and running backs in coverage; also gets juked out of potential tackles too often; simply lacks the quick feet and smooth hips to stay with pure athletes in the open field.
Comments:
Smith is an intriguing prospect who should make an immediate impact on special teams and may have a future as a starter at strong safety. When moving forward (playing the run) he looks like a legitimate top-50 pick, and is clearly an asset when playing in tight spaces. When asked to make plays on the move however, such as in coverage, his limited athleticism starts to slow him down. In the right system he can be a quality starter, but his skill set won’t interest every team.
Videos:
2011 vs Stanford 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 2 Comments

Joe Adams scouting report

Joe Adams WR Arkansas #3
Ht: 5’11″

Wt: 179

 
Strengths:
Dangerous return man (returned four punts for touchdowns in 2011). A threat to take it the distance every time he touches the ball. Elite change-of-direction ability. Good vision as a runner. Some experience lining up in the backfield. Does a nice job tracking the ball over his shoulder on deep routes. Adjusts to poorly thrown balls.
Weaknesses:
Undersized. Lacks the physical skills to fight for the ball in traffic. Durability could be an issue due to size. Suffered a mild stroke in 2009. Route running is sloppy; can break free due to his speed, but struggles to fight through press coverage.
Comments:
Adams is a dangerous weapon, but he’s limited in what he can do on the field. In certain packages, and on special teams, he can be a serious threat. But he isn’t the type of receiver who can consistently pose a threat throughout the course of the game – at least not until he adds some strength and improves his route running. As a result, Adams should be viewed as a luxury pick, not as a core player that you can build around.
Videos:
2011 vs Ole Miss 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

Nick Toon scouting report

Nick Toon WR Wisconsin #1
Ht: 6’2″

Wt: 215

 
Strengths:
Prototypical size and overall build. Does a great job going up in traffic and making plays. Shows great body control; looks comfortable along the sideline. Does a nice job adjusting to poorly thrown balls. Tough receiver; willing to go across the middle. Strong route runner; very quick with his cuts. Gives a solid effort as a blocker. NFL bloodlines; father, Al, played receiver for the Jets.
Weaknesses:
Limited straight-line speed; not a serious threat to stretch the field. Lacks the quickness to shake defenders; may struggle to consistently get open at the next level and will need to be a pure possession receiver. Missed time with turf toe injury in 2010 and also a thigh bruise.
Comments:
What you see is what you get with Toon, which is both good and bad. The downside is he has a limited upside. But the positive is he is a very safe mid-round prospect. He was a solid No. 1 in college, but lacks that something extra to make him stand out as an NFL prospect. He does everything fairly well, but nothing great. Toon should be able to contribute at the next level, but will never be a difference maker.
Videos:
2011 vs Nebraska 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

Stephen Hill scouting report

Stephen Hill WR Georgia Tech #5
Ht: 6’4″Wt: 215  
Strengths:
Elite height. Fairly well built; strong enough to fight through press coverage. Elite leaping ability, a serious threat in the red zone. Excellent hands; will come down with some tough catches in traffic. Above-average straight-line speed, especially considering his size; has the ability to stretch the field. Gets up to full speed surprisingly quickly; will blow past cornerbacks if they’re not prepared for his speed. Does a nice job tracking the ball in the air; easily adjusts to poorly thrown balls (and he’s had a lot of practice at this at Georgia Tech). Tough runner after the catch; willing to lower his shoulder and fight for extra yardage. Experience returning kicks. Blocking skills are well above average for a collegiate receiver.
Weaknesses:
Only expected to run a limited number of routes at Georgia Tech due to their triple-option attack. Route running is somewhat sloppy; not fluid making his cuts and will need to become more crisp and fluid in his movements to excel at the next level. Numbers are misleading; produced a number of big plays, but benefited from timely play calls which took advantage of defenses preparing for the triple-option and forgetting about the pass. Loses focus at times; makes some acrobatic catches, but he’ll drop some very easy ones too.
Comments:
From a pure raw talent standpoint, Hill is an elite prospect. He has the raw skills necessary to be a true No. 1 at the next level. However, he is very raw. He comes from a triple-option offense which forced him to run a limited array of routes. And even on the routes he did run, he looked sloppy and not very explosive in his cuts. However, the triple-option did develop his running and blocking skills which are both well above average. As a result, if he ever develops his route running skills, he will be the complete package. Hill’s upside should land him in the top 50 picks, and he may even draw consideration in the late 1st round. He’s a risky pick that high, and won’t contribute much as a rookie, but could end up being a steal three years down the road.
Videos:
2011 vs UNC
2011 vs Georgia, Middle Tennessee 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 2 Comments