Scouting Reports – 2012

Cordy Glenn scouting report

Cordy Glenn OG Georgia #71
Ht: 6’6″

Wt: 346

 
Strengths:
Elite size and strength. Impressive upper body strength allows him to knock smaller pass rushers off their course with ease. Has the lower body strength to anchor against bull rushers. Decent athleticism for his size; could be viewed as a right tackle prospect by some teams. Quick feet for his size. A nasty run blocker who has the ability to swallow up defenders. Gets to the second level quicker than most interior linemen. Experience at both guard and tackle; started at left tackle throughout senior year.
Weaknesses:
Occasionally struggles with speed rushers off the edge; just doesn’t have the mobility to match their explosiveness off the snap. Stamina may be a slight issue; appears to wear down throughout the course of the game and will get sloppy with his fundamentals, playing too high at times.
Comments:
Glenn was put in a tough position switching to left tackle prior to his senior year. He was surprisingly effective, but lacks the athleticism to play the position in the NFL. Most teams will view him as a guard, where he has the potential to be among the best in the game. Some more run-oriented teams may view him as a right tackle. As a guard or right tackle he is definitely a 1st-round prospect, and should be able to play at a high level from day one.
Videos:
2011 vs LSU
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

Courtney Upshaw scouting report

Courtney Upshaw OLB Alabama #41
Ht: 6’2″Wt: 273  
Strengths:
Decent athlete for his size; well above-average mobility for a defensive end. A smart, disciplined player; isn’t overaggressive in pursuit. Stays in his zone and keeps his eyes in the backfield. Impressive change-of-direction ability for an end/linebacker. A scrappy player; very active hands – can really get under an offensive lineman’s skin throughout the course of a game. Explosive off the snap. Does a nice job making himself small to slip through holes when blitzing on the inside. Also has the speed and quickness to win off the edge. Strong wrap-up tackler. Has experience playing linebacker in a 3-4, and with his hand on the ground in some 4-3 sets. Tough defender who plays through the whistle.
Weaknesses:
Sort of a ‘tweener who doesn’t fit perfectly at end or linebacker. Struggles to shed blocks against the run. A much better run defender when when at linebacker, and given more space to move. Easily tossed around by more physically imposing offensive tackles, especially when running play is headed his direction. Arrested for domestic assault in 2009; chargers were later dropped.
Comments:
Upshaw is a tough player to evaluate, because each team will view him differently based on their scheme. He has the ability to start and be an effective pass rusher in either a 4-3 or 3-4 scheme. However, due to his struggles against the run, he would probably be more valuable at linebacker in a 3-4 scheme. He works much better against the run when given space, and can be a true three-down linebacker in that system.
Videos:
2011 vs LSU (National Championship Game)
2011 vs Auburn
2011 vs Florida 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

Chandler Jones scouting report

Chandler Jones DE Syracuse #99
Ht: 6’5″

Wt: 265

 
Strengths:
Prototypical build for a pass-rushing end; tall with long, strong arms. Explosive off the snap; consistently beats offensive tackles off the edge. Strong wrap-up tackler who can also deliver the big hit. Does a nice job keeping his eyes on the backfield; good all-around awareness on the field. An intense player who plays with an impressive motor. Has some experience dropping into zone coverage. NFL bloodlines; older brother Arthur plays for Ravens. Top intangibles; coaches speak very highly of his leadership skills. Intelligent on and off the field.
Weaknesses:
Struggles to shed blocks against the run; has the frame to add some weight, which would help him against more powerful offensive linemen. Needs to develop an array of pass rush moves; too reliant on pure speed and athleticism at this stage in his career. Missed five games with an undisclosed knee injury in 2011.
Comments:
Jones would have benefited from returning to school, as he still needs to get stronger against the run, but should still draw interest from teams as early as the late 1st-round based on his potential. He has the size, strength and athleticism of a prototypical left defensive end in the 4-3 scheme, and could develop into an elite three-down lineman. Some 3-4 teams may also view him as a candidate to shift to outside linebacker, where he could make an immediate impact as a pure pass rusher. Had Jones returned to school and improved upon his weaknesses, he potentially could have climbed into the top-10 discussion. As a result, someone could wind up with a steal in the late 1st or 2nd round.
Videos:
2011 vs West Virginia 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 1 Comment

Whitney Mercilus scouting report

Whitney Mercilus DE Illinois #85
Ht: 6’4″

Wt: 265

 
Strengths:
Prototypical size for a 4-3 end or 3-4 outside linebacker. Uses his speed to consistently get into the backfield. Does a nice job keeping his eyes on the quarterback and getting his hands up into passing lanes. Impressive motor; saw a lot of double teams, but continued to fight through the whistle. Experienced lining up at various spots on the line due to Illinois’ hybrid 3-4/4-3 defense, but at his best as the five-technique (lining up outside the offensive tackle). Some experience playing with his hand off the ground. A mature team leader.
Weaknesses:
Inconsistent off the snap; dangerous when he explodes off the snap, but too often the last man out of his stance. Struggles to shed blocks against the run, but does hold his ground fairly well. Only one full year of starting experience.
Comments:
Mercilus is a unique prospect who has experience lining up all over the field at Illinois – 3-4 end, 4-3 end, 4-3 tackle, and outside linebacker – and he excelled wherever his coaches placed him in 2011. The one major concern with Mercilus is his lack of sustained production, which raises some concern that he may be a one-year wonder. He spent most of his career playing with his hand in the dirt, but he actually looks most explosive and natural at linebacker. If he lands in the right system, he could be a dangerous pass-rush threat from day one.
Videos:
2011 vs Arizona State
2011 vs UCLA
2011 vs Northwestern
2011 vs Penn State
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

Melvin Ingram scouting report

Melvin Ingram DE South Carolina #6
Ht: 6’2″Wt: 276  
Strengths:
Impressive strength. Plays with a constant motor. Impressive speed and athleticism for his size. Speed/strength combination makes him tough to block; can lower his shoulder and get around the edge, or simply bull rush his way into the backfield. Also has a nice spin move in his repertoire. Surprisingly effective dropping into coverage. Effective wrap-up tackler and a hard hitter. Experienced lining up at end, tackle and linebacker.
Weaknesses:
Only one year of starting experience. Kind of an awkward athlete, and would probably benefit from losing some weight. Plays out of control at times; doesn’t take good angles in pursuit. Doesn’t always play with good balance and leverage. Spends too much time on the ground. Needs to do a better job keeping his eyes in the backfield; seems to lose track of the ball carrier too often. Missed entire 2008 season with broken foot. Suffered a broken hand in 2010, but played through.
Comments:
Ingram has a ton of potential, which will likely land him in the mid-to-late 1st round. However, there are some concerns about his ability to transition to the next level. At South Carolina he lined up at various spots on the field in different situations to best utilize his strengths. That type of versatility is certainly an asset for a players trying to earn playing time, but few starters rotate positions throughout the course of a game. Due to his versatility and overall skill set, he may be most valuable to the teams which run some form of a hybrid 3-4/4-3 defense, and need players capable of adjusting their roles (Colts, Ravens, Jets, Patriots – to name a few). Ingram definitely has a high bust factor because, despite his talent, he just doesn’t have an obvious role in the NFL.
Videos:
2011 vs Nebraska
2011 vs Auburn
2011 vs Georgia
2011 vs East Carolina 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 1 Comment

Peter Konz scouting report

Peter Konz C Wisconsin #66
Ht: 6’5″

Wt: 315

 
Strengths:
Impressive size and strength. A nasty run blocker; gets great leverage, especially considering his height. Strong lower body allows him to hold his ground against bull rushers. Strong motor and plays with a nasty demeanor; consistently finishes off his blocks. Great awareness; keeps his head on a swivel and quick to identify blitzes. Great fundamentals in pass protection, stays low, has quick feet and excellent footwork. Impressive mobility for an interior lineman. Some experience at guard and tackle early in career. Three-year starter with plenty of experience against top competition.
Weaknesses:
Some injury concerns. Missed time in each of past three seasons with ankle injuries. Height may concern some teams, especially those with shorter quarterbacks.
Comments:
Konz is as well-rounded and polished as any center to enter the draft since Nick Mangold in 2006. Has the ability to play any position on the line if necessary, and some teams may consider him at right tackle. As long as his health checks out at the combine he’ll be a 1st-round pick, but his recurring ankle injuries are a fairly serious concern.
Videos:
2011 vs Ohio State
2011 vs Nebraska 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

David DeCastro scouting report

David DeCastro OG Stanford #52
Ht: 6’5″

Wt: 315

 
Strengths:
Elite size and strength. Dominant run blocker; does a great job staying low and using good leverage. Decent athleticism for an interior lineman; capable of getting to the second level. Well respected by teammates and coaches. Excellent work ethic. Three-year starter with plenty of experience. Has the skills necessary to play in any blocking scheme.
Weaknesses:
Adequate in pass protection, but is sort of a bend-but-don’t break blocker; gets knocked back relatively often, but continues to fight.
Comments:
DeCastro is an elite prospect, with the size, strength and mobility to play in any scheme. He is much better as a run blocker, but generally holds his ground in pass protection. He may struggle with some of the elite interior pass rushers at the next level at first, but as he continues to develop his strength and technique he should become one of the league’s top interior offensive linemen.
Videos:
2011 vs UCLA
2011 vs Notre Dame 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

Ryan Lindley scouting report

Ryan Lindley QB San Diego State #14
Ht: 6’4″

Wt: 230

 
Strengths:
Prototypical height and overall size. Four-year starter with plenty of experience. Elite arm strength; can make any NFL throw with ease. Experienced in shotgun and under center. Does a nice job looking off his target; doesn’t stare receivers down. Played under three head coaches and three offensive coordinators, which is likely partially to blame for his limited growth throughout his career; but seemed to handle each transition well. A team leader and hard worker; well respected by coaches and teammates. Understands his weaknesses and is willing to own up to his mistakes; seems to understand what he needs to do to improve – a great sign of maturity.
Weaknesses:
Accuracy is an issue; very inconsistent, and has been throughout his career. Not a great athlete; isn’t a threat to run. Needs to improve his touch; has a strong arm and likes to fire the ball whenever possible; needs to slow things down sometimes. Doesn’t always see the whole field; looks for his first read down field, and when it isn’t there hits his check-down receiver; rarely appears to look at more than two reads, and tends to stay focused on one side of the field. Missed time with a shoulder injury in 2008. Played through an ankle injury in 2010.
Comments:
Lindley has a lot of the skills you can’t teach – size, arm strength, leadership – but his accuracy has definitely held him back in terms of his growth as a quarterback. He definitely has the intangibles you want in a quarterback, and is willing to work to improve, making him worth a mid-to-late round selection as a developmental prospect. However, if his accuracy cannot improve, he won’t be long for this league.
Videos:
2011 vs La-Lafayette (bowl game)
2011 vs Michigan
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

Brandon Weeden scouting report

Brandon Weeden QB Oklahoma State #3
Ht: 6’4″

Wt: 217

 
Strengths:
Prototypical height. A decent athlete; pitched in the Yankees minor league system before returning to football. Fairly mobile; looks comfortable on roll outs; capable of buying time with his feet and occasionally taking off running. Strong arm; can make any throw on the field. Accuracy is shaky at times, but often appears due to footwork issues which are easily fixed. Mature for a rookie due to his age. A team leader; well respected by teammates and coaches.
Weaknesses:
Already 28 years old. Tends to lose his accuracy when throwing on the run. Decision making needs to improve; forces the ball into tight coverage, often when trying to force-feed Justin Blackmon the ball. Primarily took snaps out of the shotgun and did not play in an offense that translates well to the NFL; may take some time to adjust to an NFL playbook. Accuracy on throws beyond 15 yards is inconsistent. Mechanics are shaky at times; looks good when given time, but often rushes his throw and fails to set his feet; has a tendancy to throw from an open stance. Shoulder injury ended his baseball career; claims he only feels pain when throwing baseballs, not footballs, but it’s an issue that could pop up again as he ages.
Comments:
If Weeden were 22 he could potentially be worth a 2nd-round or even late-1st-round pick, but his age significantly limits his value. To draft a 28-year-old before the 3rd or 4th round, you’d have to be confident in his ability to start and be effective almost immediately. While there is a lot to like about Weeden – his arm strength, leadership, work ethic – he still needs to improve his footwork and become more comfortable with his decision-making skills under pressure. While he definitely has starter potential, he’ll be 30 before he’s ready to make a significant impact.
Videos:
2011 vs Stanford (bowl game)
2011 vs Oklahoma
2011 vs Iowa State 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 Comments Off

Brock Osweiler scouting report

Brock Osweiler QB Arizona State #17
Ht: 6’8″

Wt: 240

 
Strengths:
Impressive height with a strong overall build. Elite athleticism for a quarterback of his size; originally committed to Gonzaga to play basketball before deciding to focus on a football career. A threat to run the ball, and tough to bring down. Consistent accuracy on shorter routes. Strong arm; can make any throw asked of him. A team leader; selected as team captain in 2011 as a junior.
Weaknesses:
Has a naturally long throwing motion due to his size, but the issue is compounded by an awkward almost sidearm delivery. Motion is also very inconsistent; looks completely different from one throw to the next. Mechanics crumble under pressure; needs to remain calm and maintain his composure in the pocket. Takes a long stride when throwing from the pocket; the stride, coupled with side-arm motion takes away from his height advantage. A good athlete, but kind of awkward when he runs – looks like he doesn’t quite know what to do with all 6’8″ of himself. Tends to lock on to his first read; needs to make significant improvement in his ability to go through his progressions. Accuracy on throws beyond 15 yards is shaky. Limited experience; only one full year as the starter. Decision to turn pro after just one relatively mediocre year raises some questions (is he just in it for the money?) – he has stated it was due to the firing of Arizona State’s coaching staff.
Comments:
Based purely on potential, there’s a lot to like about Osweiler. His size, athleticism, arm strength and leadership are all pluses, and his accuracy is at least acceptable. In terms of NFL readiness, however, it’s difficult to accept any reason he gives for entering the draft and raises some questions about his motives which teams will need to address during the interview process. There are moments, primarily when given time in the pocket, when Osweiler looks like a future star. Unfortunately, he just doesn’t have the consistency to warrant a high pick. He would fit best in an organization with a stable situation at quarterback, where he can do nothing but stand on the sidelines and learn for at least the first two years of career. Throwing him into the fire too early could be detrimental to his long-term development.
Videos:
2011 vs Boise State (bowl game)
2011 vs USC 
2011 vs Illinois 
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2012 1 Comment