Scouting Reports – 2011

Ryan Mallett Scouting Report

Ryan Mallett QB Arkansas #15

Ht: 6’7

Wt: 238

Strengths:
Impressive height. Elite arm strength. Fundamentals are solid. Does a nice job of reading the entire field. Looks very patient in the pocket and knows when to check down or throw it away. Experienced in a pro-style offense. Adequate quickness; can occassionally buy time with his feet.
Weaknesses:
Decision making crumbles under pressure. He’ll force throws when his team needs a big play. Needs to improve his ability to keep his composure and remain consistent. Accuracy is average, but nothing special. Would benefit from bulking up; height is great, but he’s a little on the skinny side.
Comments:
Transferred from Michigan, where he filled in for an injured Chad Henne as a true freshman. Mallett certainly looks like a big-time quarterback, but his production hasn’t always matched his ability. An encouraging sign, however, is the fact that he improved dramatically from his junior to senior year at Arkansas. It’s tough to penalize a guy for this, but it’s worth noting that Bobby Petrino quarterbacks tend to put up big numbers in college and then flop in the NFL (Chris Redman, Brian Brohm, etc.).
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 1 Comment

Ricky Stanzi Scouting Report

Ricky Stanzi QB Iowa #12

Ht: 6’4

Wt: 230

Strengths:
Prototypical size and overall build. Made significant strides throughout his career and capped it off with one of the best senior years in Iowa history. Strong arm. Accuracy is decent and has shown improvement in this area. Developed into a very good decision maker as a senior. A true team leader on and off the field. Three-year starter.
Weaknesses:
Plagued by poor decisions throughout his career, but turned it around as a senior; is he a one-year wonder or did something really click? Limited mobility; not a threat to take off running. Physical tools are good, but nothing about him really stands out.
Comments:
It’s tough not to like Stanzi. He’s a hard worker and a gritty football player. Coaches love having guys like him to lead the team. He definitely has the tools to play in the NFL, but probably not as a long-term starter. In the mid-to-late rounds he could be safe pick and should be able to hang around the league for awhile as a capable backup. Possibly the next Kelly Holcomb.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 Comments Off

Pat Devlin Scouting Report

Pat Devlin QB Delaware #17

Ht: 6’4

Wt: 222

Strengths:
Prototypical height and overall size for a NFL quarterback. Puts a nice touch on his passes; knows when to take something off and knows when he needs to fire it into a tight spot. Accuracy is impressive. Very patient in the pocket; does a great job standing tall and keeping his eyes down field as pressure closes in around him. Appears to be very poised under pressure. Very smart with the football – threw just 3 interceptions in 384 attempts as a senior.
Weaknesses:
Level of competition is a concern; limited playing time against top defenses. Adequate arm strength, but nothing special. Takes most of his snaps out of the shotgun – something which is becoming less of a concern for NFL teams. Limited mobility; can occasionally buy time with his feet but is not a threat to run.
Comments:
Skeptics will say that Devlin is only getting publicity because people are searching for the next Joe Flacco, but he is a legitimate prospect. He isn’t quite on Flacco’s level, but he definitely possesses the skills to be a starter at the next level. Everything Devlin does makes him look like a NFL quarterback, the only question that remains is can he do it against NFL defenses? What encourages me most is his patience. He looks very cool under pressure and if he can maintain that poise at the next level he will succeed.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 Comments Off

Mark Ingram Scouting Report

Mark Ingram RB Alabama #22

Ht: 5’10

Wt: 215

Strengths:
Built like a true feature back. A physical, downhill runner. Adequate speed. Shows good hands as a receiver out of the backfield. Good vision, and is a patient runner. A hard worker and is well-liked by teammates and the coaching staff.
Weaknesses:
Missed two games in 2010 with a knee injury. Not very elusive; doesn’t make guys miss and doesn’t have the overpowering strength to consistently break tackles. Takes awhile to get to full speed.
Comments:
Son of former Giants receiver Mark Ingram… Ingram won the 2009 Heisman Trophy, but by the end of the year he wasn’t even the best running back on his own team (Trent Richardson overtook him – see Auburn game for evidence where Ingram was benched down the stretch). In 2010, they shared the load, but Ingram was not nearly as dominant. His overall stats look good, but he struggled against the better teams on Alabama’s schedule. He’s certainly built like a feature back and has shown flashes of greatness, but I worry about his ability to hold up over the course of a season in the NFL. His running style generates a lot of wear and tear. The potential is certainly there, but I would have a hard time justifying spending a 1st-round pick on a guy like Ingram. He’s a solid 2nd-round option, but not someone I can confidently say will be an impact player over the next 5-7 years. I would feel more confident drafting him if my team already had a decent running back in place to split carries with Ingram.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 1 Comment

Marcus Cannon Scouting Report

Marcus Cannon OG TCU

Ht: 6’5

Wt: 358

Strengths:
Elite size and strength. Experience at left and right tackle. Powerful lower body strength; perfect fit for a team looking for a dominant run blocker. Above average quickness and athleticism for an interior lineman.
Weaknesses:
Too slow to play tackle in the pros; doesn’t have the footwork or the overall athleticism. Missed time with an ankle injury in 2008. Limited experience against top competition. No experience at guard, where he will likely play in the NFL.
Comments:
Cannon started off as a right tackle and eventually shifted to the left side at TCU. He dominated the Mountain West but just isn’t athletic enough to play tackle at the next level. At TCU he was strong enough to manhandle the speed rushers, and big enough to handle the bull rushers. When facing a more complete NFL-caliber pass rusher in the Rose Bowl against Wisconsin’s J.J. Watt, he was embarrassed on multiple plays and struggled to keep pace with Watt’s array of moves. That said, he has the size and more than enough athleticism to make the transition to guard.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 Comments Off

Jake Locker Scouting Report

Jake Locker QB Washington #10

Ht: 6’2

Wt: 229

Strengths:
Adequate height. Good build, capable of taking hits. Above average athlete for the quarterback position. Capable of making plays with his feet. Strong arm. Fundamentals are solid. Looks good throwing the ball in the pocket and also on the run.
Weaknesses:
Durability is a serious concern. Missed time in 2007 with a neck injury. Missed nearly the entire 2008 season with a broken thumb. Missed time in 2010 with broken ribs. Decision making is also a concern. Overconfident in his ability to squeeze passes into tight coverage. Reckless with the football and has shown little to no improvement in this area throughout his career. Has developed bad habits with his decision making as a result of the lack of talent around him. Accuracy is only average. Limited experience throwing the deep ball.
Comments:
Locker is a frustrating prospect because he’s shown so much potential, but has shown so little improvement. His apologists will point to the lack of talent around him, but that doesn’t excuse the fact that he only made marginal strides from his sophomore to senior year. The foundation of an elite quarterback is definitely there – the size, build, arm strength, athleticism – but he needs a lot of work on his decision making ability. In time, he could become an upper-level NFL talent, but he has plenty of work to do.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 Comments Off

Greg McElroy Scouting Report

Greg McElroy QB Alabama #12

Ht: 6’2

Wt: 225

Strengths:
Adequate height and overall size. A team leader on and off the field. Very intelligent quarterback – and a smart kid off the field too. Smart with the football; knows the limits of his talents and won’t force balls where he can’t fit them. Decent arm strength. Decent accuracy.
Weaknesses:
Limited mobility; is not a threat to run with the football. Nothing special about him – essentially no upside.
Comments:
McElroy is your classic backup quarterback. He’s smart – on and off the field – and the ideal guy to have on your bench. In a pinch, you can throw him onto the field and he won’t miss beat. Unfortunately, the talent level just isn’t there to project him as a future starter. He shouldn’t be drafted with hopes of developing him into a starter, but he should have no problem making a roster and staying in the league as a quality backup.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 Comments Off

Da’Quan Bowers Scouting Report

Da’Quan Bowers DE Clemson

Ht: 6’4

Wt: 280

Strengths:
Elite athleticism for his size. Has the strength to play 3-4 or 4-3 end. Explosive off the snap. Has developed a nice array of pass-rush moves. Size/athleticism combination is simply too much for most tackles to handle in a one-on-one matchup. Decent lower-body strength; shows the ability to hold up at the point of attack against the run.
Weaknesses:
Speed is only marginal compared to most NFL pass rushers – may struggle to produce the same sack totals at the next level. Slow to develop; came to Clemson as the top-rated defensive prospect in the nation but made only minor contributions in his first two seasons. Is he a one-year wonder motivated by a big NFL contract? Or is he committed to continuing to improve?
Comments:
Bowers has the size, strength and athleticism to be a truly elite defensive end at the next level. However, you should always cautious about falling in love with a player who suddenly blossomed in his final collegiate season – that raises a red flag that money may be his only motivator. There are no indications that this is the case with Bowers, but teams should do their homework before investing in him. He plays with the mindset of a pass rusher, which may need to be adjusted at the next level. He doesn’t have the quickness and speed of the elite pass rushers in the NFL, but he has the potential to be a well-rounded lineman.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 Comments Off

Mikel LeShoure Scouting Report

Mikel LeShoure RB Illinois #5

Ht: 6’0

Wt: 230

Strengths:
Powerful downhill runner. Big strong legs; able to push to pile. Breaks through arm tackles with ease. Gets up to full speed quickly. Hits the hole with a powerful burst. Decent speed for his size.
Weaknesses:
Not very elusive; he’ll run over people, but he won’t make them miss in the open field. Doesn’t appear to have great vision; runs full speed ahead whether the hole is there or not. Limited experience as a receiver out of the backfield. Already comes with a decent amount of wear and tear; averaged 22.9 touches per game in 2010. Legitimate character concerns. Missed time in 2008 after breaking his jaw in a fight with a teammate. Suspended in 2009 for violating team rules.
Comments:
LeShoure is essentially Rashard Mendenhall 2.0. Like Mendenhall he burst onto the scene with a monster junior year and immediately turned pro. LeShoure’s season was even more impressive than Mendenhall’s due to the fact that he was really the only offensive weapon for the Illini. Defenses knew what was coming and he still averaged over six yards per carry. He lacks the agility and elusiveness to be considered an elite prospect, but is definitely starter material. He should be a productive NFL running back from day one, especially if he shares the workload with a smaller, faster running mate.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 1 Comment

Andy Dalton Scouting Report

Andy Dalton QB TCU

Ht: 6’2

Wt: 220

Strengths:
Adequate height and overall size. Plenty of experience – 42 wins as a starter in college. Above average athleticism; can buy time and even pick up some yardage with his feet. Very intelligent quarterback. Rarely makes a poor decision with the football. Accuracy is decent. Arm strength is adequate. A true team leader; respected by coaches and teammates.
Weaknesses:
Doesn’t do any one thing great; skill set is very average. Limited experience against top competition. Took a large percentage of snaps from the shotgun in college.
Comments:
Dalton doesn’t have the tools to be in the 1st-round conversation, but he could still develop into a starter. I wouldn’t draft him with expectations of making him a franchise quarterback, but even in his worst-case scenario he should be a capable backup. He’s smart and has great leadership qualities which would allow him to be a spot starter when needed. Even though his skill set doesn’t compare to some others in this class, few quarterbacks in recent years have entered the draft better prepared for the NFL than Dalton.
Posted on by Ryan McCrystal in Scouting Reports - 2011 1 Comment